Boilermaker Blog

Archive for the ‘Guest’ Category

Volunteers: The Boilermaker’s Beating Heart

September 5th, 2018


Cindy Dardano – Volunteer Coordinator

It has been nearly two moths since Boilermaker Sunday and already the staff is busy making plans for the 2019 race. At the moment I am sorting out left over volunteer t-shirts and streamlining what feels like endless volunteer lists. The quiet and calmness is a little unnerving after months of hustle and bustle.

It was a great race made possible by the countless incredible volunteers who parked cars, directed traffic, passed out water, emptied hundreds of trash bags, sold merchandise, distributed race packets and goody bags, set-up start and finish lines, handed out pins and towels, massaged cramped muscles, tended to a injuries, lifted and delivered fencing and barriers, entertained thousands on the course, and kept runners and spectators safe, from start to finish. This is just a small list of what our community of volunteers does to ensure that the Boilermaker Road Race runs smoothly year after year.

water station1

Although volunteers receive a t-shirt, a volunteer pin and a volunteer party, “thank you’s” never get old. So from all of us at the entire Boilermaker Office, a huge Thank You for all you do. The runners may be the body of this race but volunteers are the heart and soul.

If you are interested in volunteering for the 2019 Boilermaker Road Race, check out our website in early March for volunteer opportunities.

How Much Sleep is Enough for Runners?

August 10th, 2018


*This a guest blog post from sleep expert, Sarah Cummings at Sleep Advisor.

How Many Hours of Sleep is Enough for Runners?

Any runner who has any idea of what they need to succeed will tell you that sleep is high on the list of priorities.

It’s not merely a case of being dedicated to the cause by getting up super early to cram in the miles and slog through sprints when your eyes have just opened, because if you don’t give enough emphasis on your quality of sleep your efforts can all be pretty fruitless when it truly matters come race day!

Athletes who increased their sleep time ran faster sprints and hit more accurate tennis shots than they did while getting their usual amount of sleep, a sleep study at Stanford University in the United States found,  so studies such as these should be enough to make you want to get your sleep game on point!

sleep blog

Why is sleep so essential as part of an effective training plan?

Sleep has a huge role in a runner’s training plan. What it does is, it helps the ability to make the most of your tireless hours of devotion. No runner wants to pick up an injury, so it’s about staying as fit and healthy as possible; something which sleep can help to fulfill.

For runner’s in general, the sport can take over and everything you do will be centred around this all-encompassing sport. There’s a lot to be said for this, and the benefits to running are huge; both on the physical and mental side of things.

Sleep in lowered amounts brings on irregularities with appetite-signalling hormones in your brain. If you aren’t receiving enough sleep, you’re much more inclined to feel hunger pangs and subsequently eat more than you actually need to. Clearly, for people looking to stay in peak physical shape, this is not a good thing.

Regularly achieve high-quality levels of sleep though and you’ll rid yourself of those unnecessary waves of hunger, and make it easier to remain healthy and keep the diet in check.

When athletes use the ability to combine a sound night’s sleep with effectual training, it increases your chances of trimming down on your weight; not only this, you’re more likely to keep it off too, the American Journal of Epidemiology explains.  

The effects of losing sleep include weakening of your body’s ability to store carbohydrates; this is detrimental for endurance athletes such as runners. Another bad thing is having an inadequate sleep space, so make sure that you have a good bed, mattress and pillows in your room to optimise better sleep.

One prime example of why sleep really is one of the most important elements of successful training is this that while you’re in the deeper stages of sleep, human growth hormones (HGH) are released. HGH assists in repairing muscle and transforming fat into much-needed fuel, while also helping to strengthen bones.

If you remove that quality of sleep, then you have to come to terms with lowered HGH levels. This impact of this is that recovery time is affected after training. What’s more, sleep deficiency can also increase cortisol levels, which are stress-related hormones, which act to slow the recovery time you have.

So, just how much sleep does a runner need?

Increasingly, we’re seeing more and more elite and top-level athletes aiming to clock up more than the National Institute of Health’s recommended 7-9 hours of sleep per night (for adults), and instead seeking around 10 hours each night. For teenage athletes, you can bump these numbers up by an hour.

This is generally the sleep figures to go by if you aren’t involved in regular activities, such as running. Therefore, if you are training several times a week, then there’s absolutely no reason for you to not look to gain an extra hour’s sleep each evening to help with recovery.

This isn’t always required by every athlete, because we all know that we’re individuals, so it’s not a blanket rule for all. However, you will be able to determine what your body needs when you sleep for additional amounts of time and you wake up feeling refreshed – and the same goes for if you sleep for a lesser amount of time.

What we’re saying here is to not panic if you think you’re not getting enough sleep. Your body is good at letting you know when something’s not up to scratch!

One effective way to find out how much you need to sleep is to run a trial over the course of a week’s holiday. Don’t set an alarm, and simply take note of when you go to sleep, and then mark down when you wake up naturally each morning.

You can use sleep apps, to help you collate all the data and then work out the average sleep times so that you know what you need to function as a runner.

Lessons Learned in a Garden – Rebecca Kearns, Boilermaker Community Outreach Director

July 30th, 2018


To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow. ~ Audrey Hepburn

BUG Tomato

I have learned more about gardening in the past two years here at the Boilermaker than I ever learned in the years of my life before taking this position. More so than that, I have learned how gardening is clearly a metaphor for life.

Yes, the “big picture” can be summed up in dirt. A successful bounty starts with great dirt! Umm, sorry, soil. Your soil needs nutrients, microbes to move around, a balance of moisture and warmth and other odds and ends. You need to tend to your soil and get dirty! That is your foundation.

In to your soil, your foundation, goes your seeds. These seeds, you have faith will grow, are dependent upon the all that surrounds it (people, weather, animals, etc.), and at the mercy of the aforementioned.

Wait. What? At the mercy of? Yes. Best laid plans and intentions can be undone with a stretch of time with no rain, or too much, for example! People can forget to weed (or simply not take the time), you see where I am going. If your foundation is good and your follow through is great, you will inevitably reap what you sow. It will take time and it doesn’t always look like you are going to reap anything. And therein lies the first lesson: have faith in what you are doing even if you don’t yet see the reward and be diligent in your work.

The Boilermaker Road Race was grown in good soil. We had a single idea, a seed, if you will, to create an amazing race. 41 years running proves that was fertile soil and we’ve reaped the joy of successful events! Looking over our success and how it’s impacted our community we felt it was time to expand our “garden”. Which brings us to lesson two: share your harvest with your neighbors.

We’ve been working diligently at creating a solid foundation to grow a year-round presences in our community. Much like starting that garden we know with the right care and thought it will produce a positive impact but it takes time. The Boilermaker grew steadily over 41 years and our community outreach will too.

In the meantime we have taken our literal harvest and shared it with Mother Marianne’s West Side Kitchen. When we talk about “Boilermaker Nation” we mean our ENTIRE community. How can we do good things here if don’t start with small gestures of kindness and health?

Volunteers at Mother Marianne's West Side Kitchen

Volunteers at Mother Marianne’s West Side Kitchen

How does our garden grow? Hard work, attention to detail, water, patience and willingness to share. How about yours?

Run This Place

July 5th, 2018


When you write a book of must-run races as I did most recently with Run This Place, and you don’t have a financier receiving hush money from events to influence you in to choosing theirs, there are a lot of factors to be considered in selecting the best of the best. Sometimes you think a race belongs but something about it just doesn’t grab you. Other times it is easy to make the decision and the reasons are abundant.  The Boilermaker 15k falls into that category.

danes book1

While this will only be my third time running this famed race, it only takes one effort of being in Utica on race day to know why so many people love taking part year after year.  The challenging hills are made so much easier by the roaring crowds. The heat of July is cooled by the delicious drinks afterward. In between, the carnival atmosphere never overshadows that this is indeed a race where you want to give your all.  If for no other reason than not to disappoint the throngs of people who have come out to cheer you on, you push your limits.

Runners currently are in the biggest stage of running this country has ever seen. Race after race is vying for your attention and your dollar.  There are gimmicks. Enormous finisher medals. Mud. Soap.Electricty. In other words, if you want to find it, it is out there. But races like the Boilermaker just are.  They exist because of the community of people who support it from soup to nuts and make every single runner feel special.

Why am I running the Boilermaker?  Honestly, why aren’t you is the more important question.

The Economic Theory of Running: Are Runners Just Crazy?

June 19th, 2018


 

By Kelsey Gratien, PhD, CPC

Here I am, sitting in the YMCA parking lot feeling a deep sense of dread. First, I need to wake up three kids that are all in a deep sleep, wrangle them out of their car seats, and get them safely inside. Then, I need to push myself through an eight-mile treadmill workout while worrying that I’ll hear “Will the parent for Ryan/Molly/Ruth please report to child watch?” over the loud speaker at any moment.

This is my second time here this evening. Thirty minutes ago, after driving through rush hour traffic, I arrived. I unbuckled the two-year-old, reached for the stroller, and then realized I left the diaper bag at home– the diaper bag with all of the absolute essentials needed for this venture. As my two-year-old was angrily chanting “Child Watch, Child Watch!” I buckled her back in, started the van, and drove home. When I finally got back to the Y, all the kids had passed out.

Kelsey and kids

So, why do I do this? What motivates someone to go through all this trouble just to get in a run? This question crossed my mind as I sped up the treadmill and I’ve been contemplating it since.  Why would anyone be a runner?

Approximately five years ago, in what seems like a different lifetime, I was a “practicing” political scientist. Part of my Ph.D. dissertation focused on political behavior and why some people vote and others don’t. One theorist, American economist Anthony Downs, in his An Economic Theory of Democracy, said it may be irrational to vote. He suggested that the question should be “Why would anyone ever vote?” and posited that a person should only vote if the probability of determining the election (P) multiplied by the benefit of the preferred candidate winning (B) is greater than the many costs associated with voting (C).

A person should only vote if:  P * B > C

(For the politically curious: there have been revisions of this theory, with one suggestion being that people feel a sense of duty or obligation – such as “people fought for our right to vote” —  that provides additional motivation.)

Like Downs’ question of voters, I started asking myself “why would anyone ever run. The costs are so high, and the probability of winning any given race is nearly zero for most runners. So why are 15,000 people going to run the Boilermaker knowing full well that the prize money is out of reach?

What do we, the non-elite race enthusiasts, really get out of this? Running hurts. It’s usually not all that pleasant to run hard mile repeats or race an all-out 15k. Why would anyone give up time with family, relaxation, or additional sleep to get in some miles? Why would anyone shell out $30, $50, or $100 to run a race? What benefit could possibly outweigh those costs?

 

When I was 22, I was in graduate school with a flexible schedule and no responsibilities. I was a free bird. Looking back, the costs of running were so low. And yet, I trained sporadically and ran mediocre times. Going out for chicken wings and beer often trumped any desire to go running.

And here I am, 31 years old with a million things going on, and I’ve chosen now to be focused on running personal records and breaking 60 minutes at the Boilermaker.  Am I an irrational human being? Maybe, or perhaps despite the costs of running hitting their peak, the benefits are also at an unprecedented high.

But what would make running more beneficial to me now?

I’ve heard a lot of moms give broad justifications for running, saying things like “running allows me to be a better wife and mother,” and I do agree with that. I am now able to share my successes with my husband and kids, and that is big for me.

But what about the everyday “I don’t want to run today but I know I should” internal war that truly determines a runner’s fate? This is a battle I often lost in the past because the temptations of not running were high (“let’s go get a burger right now!”)

Today, many of my running benefits are immediate and the temptations against running are limited. One run can allow me to be more patient with my toddlers. It gives me a feeling of happiness and self-worth. And, these benefits come with 100-percent probability.  Additionally, the chance of winning races is occasionally greater than 0 for me, and wins give me added happiness. (Why winning results in happiness is another topic I’ll cover whenever I get my Ph.D. in psychology). I also find fun in the general competition (like, perhaps, how some voters find fun in elections even if their candidate loses).

As far as the temptations against running go: With kids, I can’t just kick back on the couch anymore. I can’t spontaneously go out for wings and beer. Not running would allow me to avoid some costs, like the guilt of leaving my husband alone with the kids for even more time throughout the day.

But, we’ve found ways to minimize the costs. And, these costs actually keep me from procrastinating and encourage me to run each run with purpose and efficiency. I can’t just take runs for granted.

For me, right now, the benefits are at an all-time high and the probability of receiving them are usually high.  While the costs are substantial, P*B is still greater than C. And because of this, my training has been consistent and I am experiencing all the fun of competitive racing.

So back to the original question: why would anyone run? Are runners just crazy? Well, runners do seem to be a special breed that finds joy in pushing the body to physical limits. Runners find fun in competition, even if the probability of winning the race is zero. And for runners, the feeling of self-accomplishment outweighs the costs of shoes, entry fees, lost time, guilt, and physical pain. Runners may be unique, but I’d argue that they aren’t crazy. They are rational actors who find value in all that comes with running.

Almost daily it seems someone has a comment to suggest that runners are irrational:

“The only way you’d see me running is if I was being chased.”

 “You actually pay money to run?”

“If people actually enjoy running, why do they look so miserable doing it?”

It’s always been hard for me to explain to anyone, including myself, why I feel the need to run. But I do believe it has to do with benefits associated with running and how we perceive them. We find the benefits of self-accomplishment, competition, personal records, and general achievement to outweigh the physical pain, money and time. So, at the Boilermaker start line, when you’re asking yourself, “Why did I sign up for this?,” remember, you are a rational being and it will all be worth it!

The author is an information consultant in the Value-Based Payment Analytics department at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

Boilermaker Spirit Inspire’s Buffalo’s Run 716

June 1st, 2018


run 716 logo

After many years of running in the Boilermaker, three of Western New York long time participants and area race organizers felt that Buffalo, New York deserved a “Boilermaker Style” 15K of its own.  In 2017, after 2 years of planning, RUN716 was off and running. With over 1,000 participants in its first year, organizers are looking forward to their 2nd go-round, scheduled for Sunday, August 5, 2018 at 7:16 am.

The race is filled with elements that Boilermaker runners will recognize and appreciate. RUN716 is hosted by F.X. Matt Brewing Company’s partner Flying Bison Brewery which located in Buffalo’s revitalized Larkinville District. Similar to the Boilermaker, course features provides a tour of some of Buffalo’s most scenic sites including  the canal side and the city’s newly renovated harbor. Even the race’s presenting sponsor, Univera Healthcare, is a subsidiary of the Boilermaker 15K’s presenting sponsor, Excellus BlueCross BlueShield.

The best part of all of this? Participants of the Utica Boilermaker get a special savings registration code for Run716. Stop by the Run716 booth at the Fitness Mill health  Boilermaker expo to receive your promotional code. 

RUN716 proceeds help fund the Food Bank of WNY, Buffalo’s Police Athletic League and Opioid Addiction Prevention.

Learn more about this event by visiting RUN716.com

Why I Run – by Ellen Brunet

April 10th, 2018


The 2018 Boilermaker will be the closest our race ever comes to the 4th of July, our most patriotic holiday and the day our nation celebrates its freedom – including our ability to “run for fun”. It is therefore appropriate that we share this story from Boilermaker runner Ellen Brunet who runs for a very specific reason: to honor fallen Marine and Baldwinsville, New York native, Corporal Kyle R Schneider.

Why I Run

In 2011 I ran The Boilermaker with tears in my eyes and a heavy heart. My friends’ son, Corporal Kyle R Schneider, had been KIA while serving with the Marines in Afghanistan just a few weeks prior. That race was the beginning of my new purpose for running: To honor and remember Kyle.

A few months later I asked Kyle’s parents if I could run the Marine Corps Marathon to honor their son. When I got to mile 26 they were waiting for me and, from the finish line, together we walked to Section 60 Grave 9720 in Arlington National Cemetery to visit our hero.

That was over 200 races and 20 marathons ago. Sometimes during a race, while facing down tough a hill or extreme heat, I remind myself why I do what I do. That mile in Arlington with Kyle’s mother and father will always be the hardest of my life. Our freedom is a gift; a gift that our military gives to us so that we can enjoy days like Boilermaker Sunday. What we do is easy, what they do is hard.

CplKyleSchneiderPrintPic 6 9 15

The Schneider’s biggest fear is that their son will be forgotten.  Kyle’s motto was: “It’s my turn to make a difference”. That’s what is on the front of our Freedom Team shirts. Kyle’s photo is on the back. During every race I have people ask me about Kyle and they tell me about their father, their brothers and sisters, or their own service. I never met Corporal Schneider but there’s no person who has influenced my life more. His legacy alone makes me want to be a better person – to Honor our military and their families in all that I do. On race day look for Corporal Schneider’s image among the runners and also take a moment to remember, our freedom is not free.

Brunet image

Learn more about Kyle’s service and the foundation his parents have started at www.cplkyleschneider.com

 

A New Year

January 2nd, 2018


The end of the year is great for three things: to celebrate our successes, to determine our failures, and to set new goals.

The Boilermaker has a lot to celebrate as we close this year. The 40th running went off without a hitch! With a record number of participants and sponsors our community came out in droves to support our hometown race. No sooner did we put our sneakers away did we start to plan for the 2018 race. That ball is already rolling and believe it or not the race is less than 200 days away already.

This year we kicked off the Boilermaker Urban Initiative with a fundraising campaign. Did you know that this was the first time the Boilermaker created a fundraiser for our own outreach programming? Did you know that we are a not-for-profit agency? Yea! We are! The inaugural Run for U campaign raised $25,000 for the Boilermaker Urban Initiative, speaking volumes about not only your generosity but the special place this race continues to occupy in this community’s collective heart. Speaking very honestly, there were moments in this office that we were genuinely humbled by you.

We have a lot to celebrate here at 805 Court Street. It was a good year. But with success comes struggles. Struggles can be good! They provide opportunity to regroup, re-plan and find a new path for successful growth. We said good-bye to an outstanding president. Our public market limped along and we are still trying to plug all the pieces in for the Boilermaker Urban Initiative.

Boy, have these successes and struggles really given us some perspective and direction. We are re-working the plan for the Public Market…. And it’s going to be good! The Boilermaker Urban Garden, was such a highlight of the year but we can do better. Do you know what it’s like to make a difference in a community and in the life of a teenager? Well it’s pretty gosh darn incredible! Not to mention the 80 plus kids we inspired in the Boilermaker Kids In Training after school running club. All of these areas are expanding in 2018!

Our goals for 2018 are pretty simple: become the best Boilermaker, in all our capacities, that we can be. We will continue to bring you the best Boilermaker experience as we work to make this year better than last because YOU keep coming back and we love that! But we are going to be a better Boilermaker for you as we keep growing the Boilermaker Urban Initiative and our beloved community, throughout the year.

Many thanks to those who supported us in 2018! The 1600 people who donated to “Run for U”, the thousands of volunteers that gave us their time Boilermaker weekend, the individuals that helped get the Boilermaker Urban Initiative off the ground and of course our runners. You compel us to be better! THANK YOU!

May 2018 bring you the best you ever.

Corporate Cup Camaraderie

June 2nd, 2017


The following is a guest post from Boilermaker Corporate Cup Director, Cosmo Costellano. 

Does your company have an employee team running in the Boilermaker Corporate Cup Competition?  If not, there is still time to register, and it is totally free! Countless studies have proven the importance of a fit workforce ranging from reduced absenteeism, greater productivity to reduced insurance premiums. There is no doubt that the company that exercises together builds a greater team mentality as well as camaraderie.

But are these the only reasons to enter a Corporate Cup team this year- No! Participating in the Corporate Cup is just plain fun!

Each team runner receives a commemorative Corporate Cup Mug. Many teams select one of the Boilermaker T-Shirt printers to outfit your team with runner’s singlets to proudly display your company logo in the race. A Corporate Cup after work event is held within two weeks after the race to award each of the top three teams in each category with a trophy plaque to display. Enjoy food, beverages and a chance to win free registration for Boilermaker 2018.

In addition to our own fun, we are pleased to award three charities with $500 each year.   The charities are selected at random during the awards event from charities designated by each of the company teams. You have a chance to not only run well but do well for the community.

Competition categories are established for male, female, coed and masters teams and also large, medium, and small size companies. There is a competition category for every business.

The bonds developed among the runner-employees last long after the Boilermaker event. Most of the teams competing return year after year, and friendly rivalries have been fun to watch. Browse through past results at http://www.boilermaker-corpcup.com/.

There is still time to field your team for 2017. The deadline is June 30th, so do not delay.

Pick your reason:

  • promotes healthy activity and team-building among employees
  • company visibility in Utica’s largest sporting event
  • free gift for each employee runner
  • Invitation to awards ceremony
  • gifts to charity
  • it’s fun
  • it’s free

Whatever reason, please join us.  Your company’s participation is a clear win-win — in terms of health, morale and productivity, and community involvement.

All employee runners of all levels are welcome.  To encourage participation, just the top three or top five finish times are used for the team score. Additional employee runners add to the fun and camaraderie.

Download the rules and registration form now at  http://www.boilermaker-corpcup.com/ccup2017.pdf  We’ll be looking for you at the finish line.

 

 

 

 

Meet Jacob, 2017 Wheelchair Challenger

May 19th, 2017


The following is a guest contribution from Gary Roback, Co-Director of the Boilermaker Wheelchair Division. It includes a letter from Jacob Moore, a 2017 Wheelchair Challenge competitor. 

It seems like everyone that volunteers, races, walks or watches the Boilermaker has a particular part of the event that they thoroughly enjoy.  For some, it’s the challenge.  For some, it’s the enjoyment of helping others or being part of something much bigger than oneself.  Still for others, being a part of the Boilermaker is a passion.  In the early 90’s my wife, my two kids and I started as goody bag “stuffers” and we all got hooked.  We then ‘graduated’ to helping stuff race packets with bibs and safety pins.  A few years later an opportunity evolved within a relatively new committee – the Wheelchair Division.   Ever since the first time I ran the Boilermaker in 1983, the ‘chairs’ were the most inspirational, powerful part of the entire event for me.   There was just something about what I saw that drew me in.  So when the opportunity came up to join that committee, I did just that.  One of the first tasks I was asked to do was, along with Richard Panetta, develop what became known as the ‘Wheelchair Challenge’.  With runners, getting a quality pair of running shoes, although they can be expensive, is typically your major investment (other than your time and effort).  Wheelchair racing is a bit different.  You can’t easily do a wheelchair race without a racing wheelchair.  However, even the most basic racing wheelchair costs about $2,500 causing a financial barrier to some that made participating just a dream.  Our primary motive was to help break down that financial barrier by creating the ‘Challenge’.  We would award a custom built racing chair to an athlete that had the drive, desire and passion to complete the 15k Boilermaker in an everyday wheelchair.   Many times winning the chair is more than just a prize, it can represent a positive life changing experience. It can help people adjust to whatever life throws at them.  It represents the power of the human spirit. And to that end, the program has been a great success.  To date, we have awarded 28 custom built racing wheelchairs to Challengers.

 

Once again in 2017, we will have an athlete pursing the Challenge.  His bio below clearly shows he has the passion and desire to be successful.  So if you see Jacob on the course on Boilermaker Sunday, cheer him on. To Jacob, the challenge represents a whole lot more than just winning a chair.

As a kid growing up with Spina Bifida I never looked at something and told myself that I could not do it as well or better than others. Often times I was right and also often I was shown I could be just as wrong. Thing is though I never let someone tell me I could or couldn’t do something, and I always challenged myself and pushed as far as I could.  Spina Bifida as a child and for most of my adult life  was never really seen as a set back to me. I played baseball as a pitcher and 3rd baseman. I played water polo every summer as a kid all the way through high school and also I swam varsity in high school.  After high school I started biking. I very much valued the times where I could just get on my bike and go. Pop on some music ride down the canal. It was peaceful, relaxing and I still to this day value the times I was out on my bike and witnessed things I normally would not have. The sunsets, the wildlife and even some of the people I met while riding who all had stories too. I miss it all

About 4 years ago in November I noticed that I was kicking my left heel into the ground. I was trying to “wake it up”. It felt like it had gone to sleep, my foot was going numb. I noticed this routinely would happen. Slowly this started moving up my leg. Christmas came around and I told my family of my concerns about this. The numbness was spreading. I Could no longer walk up or down the stairs. We had to move our room downstairs. It was also around this time where if I wanted to walk just about anywhere I would have to use my girlfriend for support. For example holding onto her shoulders so I could walk somewhere. About a week into January 2014 I sat in a wheelchair and to this day it is the only way I can get around. Later in the year of 2014 I was diagnosed with Sarcoidosis of the spine. The doctor who diagnosed me said it is only the 2nd time he has ever heard of it attacking the spine. Of course it was the first time he had diagnosed it.

My interest in racing and also doing the Boilermaker Wheelchair Challenge are similar.  I am 40 years old. I am overweight and as far as activity goes I only recently started to try and get active again. I want to challenge myself again. I want to say to myself I can do that. Then I want to go out and do what I said I can do. In the end I want to do this for myself. I want to be able to say to myself and to my family that I challenged myself and that I did not back down and I saw it through to the end.

In the end maybe I am being greedy but I feel like competing in The Boilermaker and finishing  it represents me grabbing back some of my independence that I may have lost the last few years. In completing this and in preparing for this I also believe it will help me in the long run for adjusting to life in a wheelchair. Yes, I have been in a wheelchair for a while, but you don’t just get used to it. It changes you, and in the end maybe this challenge is part of the change.

Jacob Moore